Precision To Have Prominent Presence at AMCP Annual Meeting 2017

AMCP is coming to Denver March 27th -30th, and Precision is looking forward to the chance to show off our capabilities and experts with a booth presence, three presentations, four posters and more!

Look for us on the exhibitor floor in Booth 312, and check below for complete information on all of our scientific presentations. To schedule a meeting with one of our subject matter experts, please email Carolyn Hillegass at Carolyn.Hillegass@precisionhealtheconomics.com

Didactic Presentation and Panel Discussion:

“Managing Orphan Drugs for Rare Diseases: Challenges, Opportunities, and Value Assessment”

Panelists:

Anupam Jena; Jessica Daw, PharmD, Senior Director, Clinical Pharmacy UPMC Health Plan; Patricia Furlong, President and CEO Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy; Dennis Matthews, Professor and Chair Department of PM&R, Colorado School of Medicine.

Time/Place:

Monday, March 27th, 3:00pm-4:40pm, Colorado Convention Center

(Part of  “Specialty Pharmacy Connect—AMCP Pre-Meeting Event”)

Summary:

The Orphan Drug Act of 1983 established incentives for the development of drugs used to treat rare diseases—conditions that affect fewer than 200,000 people in the United States. More than 400 medications have been approved with orphan status since then. Today, orphan drugs are being approved at a record pace, and they account for an ever-increasing percentage of specialty drug approvals.

Rare diseases and orphan drugs pose unique challenges for payers, because standard population management strategies often don’t apply. This session will provide the payer perspective on managing orphan drugs for rare diseases and explore promising methods for assessing the value of treatment.

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Panel:

“Making the Leap from Value Measurement to Value-based Reimbursement”

Panelists:  

Dana Goldman (Moderator), Peter Neumann, Jeremy Schafer, Dean Hakanson

Time/Place:

Wednesday, March 29th, 3:00pm-4:15pm, Colorado Convention Center

Summary:

As calls increase for a health system based on value rather than volume, the focus grows on how to actually measure and assess “value.” Controversy persists over how value ought to be measured, and stakeholders are even less clear on how to make use of value assessments already in the marketplace.

A number of different “value frameworks” have been proposed, but their relevance to coverage and reimbursement decision-making remains untested and unclear. Additionally, efforts to develop outcome- or value-based contracts have been underway for years, but these efforts have met with numerous challenges.

This panel will review the opportunities and challenges faced in both measuring value and in implementing innovative contracting solutions.

Rare diseases and orphan drugs pose unique challenges for payers, because standard population management strategies often don’t apply. This session will provide the payer perspective on managing orphan drugs for rare diseases and explore promising methods for assessing the value of treatment.

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Panel:

“The Present and Future of Oncology Care Management”

Panelists:

Steve Boekenoogen (Moderator), Maureen Hennessey, Jeremy Schafer

Time/Place:

Thursday, March 30th, 8:00am-9:15am, Colorado Convention Center, Room 2A-3A

Summary:

In recent years, a convergence of factors—including rapidly escalating costs of care—has compelled payers to explore new approaches to managing oncology care. As a result, oncology has become “ground zero” in the evolution from traditional fee-for-service payment systems to alternative models based on value and quality. What approaches are proving to be most successful or promising for achieving the goals of better care, smarter spending, and optimal patient outcomes?

This session will provide an overview of existing and emerging oncology care management techniques. Attendees will leave with a better understanding of payer-level strategies (e.g., screening for early intervention, episode of care payments) and government initiatives (e.g., the Medicare Oncology Care Model) that are changing the oncology landscape by adding payer elements into providers’ decision making.

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Poster:

“Measuring the Relationship Between Patient Adherence to Atypical Antipsychotics and Their Other Medications”

Authors:  

Jason Shafrin, Darius Lakdawalla, Joanna MacEwan, Alison Silverstein, Ainslie Hatch, Felicia Forma

Time/Place:

Tuesday, March 28, 5:45-7:30pm (Author Hour), Hall DE, Colorado Convention Center

Summary:

Patients with serious mental illness (SMI) often use multiple medications to treat their mental and physical illnesses. In this study, the authors find that information on antipsychotic adherence provided significant predictive power of patient adherence to their other medications. 

This finding suggests that new digital medicine technologies measuring adherence to antipsychotics may be useful for predicting adherence to other commonly used medications.

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Poster:

“Evaluating Hepatitis C Screening and Treatment for Medicaid, Medicare, and Commercially-insured patients”

Authors:

Karen Mulligan (presenter), Jeff Sullivan, Lara Yoon, Karen Van Nuys

Time/Place:

Tuesday, March 28, 5:45-7:30pm (Author Hour), Hall DE, Colorado Convention Center

Summary:

Mulligan and colleagues evaluate the Hepatitis C (HCV) screening to treatment continuum for patients with Medicaid, Medicare, and commercial insurance.

The authors find increasing efficiency through reflex and combination testing leads to fewer patients lost to follow up and more patients treated for HCV.

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Poster:

“A Real-World Cost Comparison of IVIG and SCIG Treated PIDD Patients​”

Authors:

Josh M. Noone, Chris Runken, Christopher M. Blanchette, Emily Zacherle, Reuben Howden

Time/Place:

Tuesday, March 28, 5:45-7:30pm (Author Hour), Hall DE, Colorado Convention Center

Summary:

Primary Immune Deficiency Disorder (PIDD) is a group of rare hereditary disorders which occur as a result of defects in the immune system. PIDD is often associated with acute or recurrent infections, thereby resulting in higher health care costs and utilization.

This purpose of this study was to compare real-world PIDD-related and total annual costs between treatment naïve PIDD patients receiving IVIG and SCIG treatments by utilizing Marketscan commercial data.

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Poster:

“Estimated Cost of HIV Treatment Failure Based on Pill Burden Among HIV-Infected Individuals in the United States”

Authors:

Karen Mulligan, Oliver Diaz, Alan Oglesby, Ronald D’Amico, Curtis Cooper, Anupam Bapu Jena

Time/Place:

Tuesday, March 28, 5:45-7:30pm (Author Hour), Hall DE, Colorado Convention Center

Summary:

The authors of this study estimate the long-term medical expenditures associated with loss of HIV viral control by varying degrees of pill burden and treatment adherence.

In conclusion, the authors found that patients on single tablet regimens (STRs) progress to higher lines of therapy more slowly, and STRs generate $21.7 million in medical expenditure savings compared to 3-pill regimens over a 5-years horizon, with savings increasing to $95.5 million for a 25-year horizon.